Myristica grandifolia A. DC.

Myristica grandifolia

Distribution:

Fiji: Ovalau, Taveuni, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu

local names:

kau damu – Fiji
male – Fiji

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References:

[1] James Sinclair: Florae Melanesianae Precursores – XLII. The Genus Myristica in Malesia and outside Malesia. Garden’s Bulletin, Singapore 23: 1-540. 1968
[2] Albert C. Smith: Flora Vitiensis Nova: A new flora of Fiji (Spermatophytes only). Vol. 2. Lawai, Kauai, Hawaii 1981

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Phaleria glabra (Turrill) Domke

Phaleria glabra

Distribution:

Fiji: Kadavu, Ovalau, Taveuni, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu
Samoa: Tutuila
Tonga: ‘Eua

local names:

buibuita – Viti / Fiji
cua ni lawa – Viti / Fiji
matiavi – Viti / Fiji
rauwosi – Viti / Fiji
sinu lau – Viti / Fiji

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References:

[1] Albert C. Smith: Flora Vitiensis Nova: A new flora of Fiji (Spermatophytes only). Vol. 2. Lawai, Kauai, Hawaii 1981

Dichaetomyia taveuniana Pont & Evenhuis

Taveuni House Fly (Dichaetomyia taveuniana)

The Taveuni House Fly was described in the year 2006, it was found during the sorting of insect trap material from the islands of Taveuni and Viti Levu.

It is a small, orange colored fly with a dark pattern on the dorsal side of the thorax.

~~~

The species belongs to a quite large genus, of which, however, only three species are known to occur on the Fijian Islands. Beside the new species these are the Elegant House Fly (Dichaetomyia elegans Malloch), which is known from the islands of Ovalau, Vanua Levu and Viti Levu, and the Orange House Fly (Dichaetomyia vicaria (Walker)), which is widely distributed, and which may not be native to the Fijian Islands.

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References:

[1] Adrian C. Pont; Neal Evenhuis: A New Species of Dichaetomyia Malloch (Diptera: Muscidae) from the Fijian Islands. Fiji Arthropods VI. Edited by Neal L Evenhuis & Daniel J. Bickel. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 90: 3-7. 2006

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edited: 23.06.2017

Septaria suffreni (Récluz)

Samoan Limpet Snail (Septaria suffreni)

Distribution:

Fiji: Kadavu, Ovalau, Taveuni, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu
Samoa

local names: –

***

This species occurs from New Caledonia and Vanuatu, Melanesia to Fiji and Samoa in the westernmost Polynesia, where it inhabits tidal regions of rivers and streams but can also be found well inland.

The Samoan Limpet Snail is the most common member of its genus in the rivers of Samoa.

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References:

[1] A. Haynes: A revision of the genus Septaria Férussac, 1803 (Gastropoda: Neritimorpha) Annalen des Naturhisorischen Museums Wien 103 B: 177-229. 2001

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Photo: S. Hashizume, 2008
http://jocv183199.web.fc2.com

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edited: 22.12.2018

Alangium villosum ssp. vitiense (A. Gray) Bloemb.

Alangium villosum ssp. vitiense

Distribution:

Fiji: Fulaga, Gau, Kabara, Koro, Lakeba, Nayau, Ovalau, Taveuni, Vanua Balavu, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu

local name:

ai ula ni sala – Viti Levu / Fiji
draga – Viti Levu / Fiji
kainisiga – Viti Levu / Fiji
kau ni sau – Viti Levu / Fiji
meme – Viti Levu / Fiji
na wiwi – Viti Levu / Fiji
teinivia – Viti Levu / Fiji
titilairo – Lau Islands / Fiji

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References:

[1] Albert C. Smith: Flora Vitiensis Nova: A new flora of Fiji (Spermatophytes only). Vol. 3. Lawai, Kauai, Hawaii 1985

Dicranopteris linearis (Burm. f.) Underw.

Dicranopteris linearis

Distribution:

Austral Islands: Raivavae, Rapa, Rimatara, Rurutu, Tubuai
Cook Islands: ‘Atiu, Mangaia, Ma’uke, Rarotonga
Fiji: Lakeba, Nayau, Rotuma, Taveuni, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu
Gambier Islands: Agakauitai, Akamaru, Aukena, Kamaka, Mangareva, Taravai
Hawai’i Islands: Hawai’i, Kaua’i, Lana’i, Maui, Moloka’i, O’ahu
Marquesas: Eiao, Fatu Hiva, Hiva Oa, Mohotani, Nuku Hiva, Tahuata, Ua Huka, Ua Pou
New Zealand: North Island
Norfolk Islands: Norfolk Island
Pitcairn Islands: Pitcairn Island
Samoa: Ofu, Olosega, Savai’i, Ta’u, Tutuila, ‘Upolu
Society Islands: Bora Bora, Huahine, Mai’ao, Maupiti, Moorea, Raiatea, Tahaa, Tahiti
Tonga: ‘Eua, Kao, Niuafo’ou, Tafahi, Tofua
Wallis & Futuna: Futuna, ‘Uvea

local names:

asaua – Samoa
tuanu’e – Mangaia, Ma’uke, Raraka / Cook Islands
tuenu’e – ‘Atiu / Cook Islands
uluhe – Hawai’i Islands

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Photo: Kim Starr & Forest Starr; by courtesy of Kim Starr & Forest Starr

http://www.starrenvironmental.com

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edited: 10.04.2019

Geniostoma rupestre J. R. Forst. & G. Forst.

Geniostoma rupestre

Distribution:

Austral Islands: Rapa, Rurutu (?)
Fiji: Fulaga, Gau, Kadavu, Koro, Lakeba, Nasoata, Nayau, Ovalau, Rotuma, Taveuni, Vanua Balavu, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu, Waya
Marquesas: Fatu Hiva, Hiva Oa, Nuku Hiva, Tahuata, Ua Pou
New Zealand: Great Barrier Island; Kapiti Island; North Island; Aorangi Island (Poor Knights Islands); Rangitoto Island; South Island; Manawa Tawhi Island, South West Island (Three Kings Islands); Tiritiri Matangi Island
Niue
Pitcairn Islands: Henderson Island
Samoa: Fanuatapu, Namu’a, Nu’ulua, Nu’utele, Savai’i, Ta’u, Tutuila, ‘Upolu
Society Islands: Mo’orea, Tahiti
Tonga: ‘Eua, Ha’apai, Kao, Motutapu, Onevai, Tafahi, Tofua, Tongatapu, ‘Uta Vava’u
Wallis & Futuna: Alofi, Futuna, ‘Uvea

local names:

age – Rurutu / Austral Islands
ange – Rapa / Austral Islands
faipuu – Society Islands
hangehange – New Zealand
taipoipoi – Samoa

~~~

The species is split into several varieties, of which at least four occur within the Polynesian region, Geniostoma rupestre var. crassum (Cheeseman) Conn (endemic to New Zealand), Geniostoma rupestre var. glaberrimum (Benth.) Conn (most parts of Polynesia, especially French Polynesia), the nominate Geniostoma rupestre var. rupestre (western Polynesia), and Geniostoma rupestre var. tongense (A. C. Sm. & Stone) Conn (Fiji, Niue and Tonga).

Many of these varieties include synonyms that formerly were treated as distinct species. [1]

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References:

[1] Barry J. Conn: A taxonomic revision of Geniostoma Subg. Geniostoma (Loganiaceae). Blumea 26: 245-364. 1980

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geniostoma-r-v-rupestre-tt

nominate variety

Photo: Tavita Togia
http://www.inaturalist.org/people/tavita_togia2016

(under creative commons license (4.0))
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0

Emoia concolor (Duméril)

Fiji Green Tree Skink (Emoia concolor)

Distribution:

Fiji: Beqa, Dravuni, Gau, Kadavu, Kia, Koro, Lami, Lau Islands, Moala, Nasoata, Ovalau, Rotuma (?), Taveuni, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu, Viwa, Waya, Yadua Taba, Yagasa

local names:

mokosari – Fiji
sari – Fiji

***

The Fiji Green Tree Skink was described in 1851, it is endemic to the Fijian Islands, possibly except for the outlying Rotuman Islands (there appears to exist at least one specimen that was collected on Rotuma, so it may have formerly occured there as well).

The species is about 20 cm long, it is mainly variably greenish to brownish and well camouflaged.

The Fiji Green Tree Skink is a tree-dwelling species and inhabits most of the forested areas including agricultural and suburban areas, it is less common or completely absent were introduced mongooses are found. [1]

***

Some island populations may constitute distinct subspecies or even species, but further research is needed to proove this assumption.

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References:

[1] Walter C. Brown: Lizards of the genus Emoia (Scincidae) with observations on their evolution and biogeography. California Academy of Sciences 1991

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emoia-concolor-dpr

Photo: Dr. Paddy Ryan; by courtesy of Dr. Paddy Ryan

http://www.ryanphotographic.com

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edited: 01.01.2019

Mirimiri acrodonta (Hill & Beckon)

Fijian Monkey-faced Bat (Mirimiri acrodonta)

The Fijian Monkey-faced Bat was described as recently as 1978.

This Flying Fox is about 20 cm long and has a wingspan of up to 70 cm, it is nocturnal and feeds mainly on fruits.

This species is up to now known to occur exclusively in the wet montane forest (at an elevation of about 1000 m) on the island of Taveuni. It is possible, that it may also occur on the adjacent island of Vanua Levu, but this is, however, still unresolved so far.

Unfortunately the Fijian Monkey-faced Bat is considered critically endangered, the reasons for this are found mainly in the destruction of its habitat.

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References:

[1] Kristofer M. Helgen: Systematics of the Pacific monkey-faced bats (Chiroptera : Pteropodidae), with a new species of Pteraloplex and a new Fijian genus. Systematics and Biodiversity 3(4): 433-453. 2005
[2] Jorge M. Palmeirim; Alan Champion; Alivereti Naikatini, Jone Niukula; Marika Tuiwawa; Martin Fisher; Mere Yabaki-Gounder; Sólveig Thorsteinsdóttir; Stanley Qalovaki; Thomas Dunn: Distribution, Status, and Conservation of Bats in the Fiji Islands. Oryx 41(4): 509-519. 2006

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mirimiri-acrodonta-wnb

Photo: William N. Beckon

(under creative commons license (3.0))
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0