Miocalles superstes (Zimmerman)

Marotiri Miocalles Weevil (Miocalles superstes)

Distribution:

Austral Islands: Marotiri Rocks

local names: –

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The Marotiri Miocalles Weevil was described in the year 1936 (as Microcryptorhynchus superstes Zimmerman).

This species is known only from the tiny Southeast Islet of the Marotiri group in the south of the Austral Archipelago, where the animals can be found on St.-John’s Beggarticks (Bidens saint-johniana Sherff) and on Yellow Purslane (Portulaca lutea Soland. ex G. Forst.), on which they obviously feed.

The flightless Marotiri Miocalles Weevil is only about 0,2 cm long, and reddish brown in color. [1]

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References:

[1] Elwood C. Zimmerman: Curculionidae of Marotiri, South-Central Pacific (Coleoptera). Pacific Insects 8(4): 893-903. 1966

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edited: 30.12.2018

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Miocalles maii Paulay

Maii Miocalles Weevil (Miocalles maii)

Distribution:

Austral Islands: Rapa

local names: –

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The Maii Miocalles Weevil was described in 1985, it is endemic to the island of Rapa, Austral Islands, where it was found on the Ma’ii-Anatakuri ridge.

The species is about 0,2 cm long and 0,09 cm wide, it is black to dark reddish brown, some individuals have lighter, reddish-brown patches centrally on their elytra. The legs are reddish brown.

The host plant of this species are native tongue fern spp. (Elaphoglossum spp.). [1]

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References:

[1] Gustav Paulay: Adaptive radiation on an isolated oceanic island: Cryptorhynchinae (Curculionidae) of Rapa revisited. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 26: 95-187. 1985

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edited: 30.12.2018

Miocalles albolineatus Paulay

White-lined Miocalles Weevil (Miocalles albolineatus)

Distribution:

Austral Islands: Rapa

local names: –

***

The White-lined Miocalles Weevil is part of a enormous radiation comprising more than 70 species all of which are endemic to the island of Rapa, Austral Islands.

The species reaches a size of about 0,2 cm, it is shiny black, the elytra are reddish-brown centrally and are decorated with bright withe squamose patterns.

The species appears to have adapted to the native Weak Chain Fern (Blechnum attenuatum (Sw.) Mett.) as host plant species. [1]

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References:

[1] Gustav Paulay: Adaptive radiation on an isolated oceanic island: Cryptorhynchinae (Curculionidae) of Rapa revisited. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 26: 95-187. 1985

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edited: 30.12.2018