Tag Archives: Hymenoptera

Anoplius caerulescens (Dalla Torre)

Blue Spider Wasp (Anoplius caerulescens)

This species, which was described in the year 1879, is widely distributed from Australia and parts of Melanesia to the Fijian Islands.

The Blue Spider Wasp can easily be distinguished from the other two closely related spider wasp species known from the Fijian Islands by its bright glossy cobalt blue to purple coloration.

The males are about 0,7 to 1 cm long, the females are larger.

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References:

[1] Francis X. Williams: Aculeate Wasps of Fiji. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 18(21): 317-336. 1947
[2] Neal L. Evenhuis: Checklist of Fiji Hymenoptera. Bishop Museum Technical Report 38(11): 1-29. 2007
[3] James P. Pitts; Joseph S. Wilson; Frank D. Parker: The spider wasps of Fiji (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae). Fiji Arthropods VII. Edited by Neal L. Evenhuis & Daniel J. Bickel. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 91: 3-15. 2007

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anoplius-caerulescens-w-jpp

female

anoplius-caerulescens-m-jpp

male

Photos from: ‘James P. Pitts; Joseph S. Wilson; Frank D. Parker: The spider wasps of Fiji (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae). Fiji Arthropods VII. Edited by Neal L. Evenhuis & Daniel J. Bickel. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 91: 3-15. 2007’

by cortesy of James P. Pitts

Monomorium antarcticum (Fr. Smith)

Common New Zealand Ant (Monomorium antarcticum)

The genus Monomorium contains over 300 species, with six species occurring in New Zealand, only two (or three) of which are native resp. endemic to New Zealand.

Altogether about five native species are known to exist within the Polynesian region.

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The Common New Zealand Ant is actually not a species but a species complex, which contains at least four distinct species, and which needs further investigation.

The ‘species’ reaches a size of about 0,3 to 0,4 cm.

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In the year 1936 (and again in the year 2002) a ant species was found on the island of Rapa / Austral Islands, that was identified as this ‘species’ – these ants, which seem indeed to be native to this island, however, most probably represent another, distinct, and hitherto undescribed species from the species complex. [1][2]

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References:

[1] William Morton Wheeler: Ants from the Society, Austral, Tuamotu and Mangareva Islands. Bernice P. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 12(18). 1936
[2] R. A. Englund: Report for the 2002 Pacific Biological Survey, Bishop Museum Austral Islands, French Polynesia Expedition to Raivavae and Rapa Iti. prepered for: Délégation à la Recherche (Ministère de la Culture, de l’Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche), B.P. 20981 Papeete, Tahiti, Polynésie française. 2003

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monomorium-antarcticum-an-antweb

Photo: April Nobile
http://www.antweb.org

(under creative commons license (3.0))
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0

Hylaeus simplex (Perkins)

Hawaii Yellow-masked Bee (Hylaeus simplex)

In the beginning of the 20th century the Hawaii Yellow-masked Bee was one of the most common members of its genus and could be found almost everywhere on its home island, from sea level up to the mountain rainforests.

Nevertheless the species is now considered extinct, whereby the reasons for its decline and, in the end, complete extinction are absolutely unknown.

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References:

[1] Howell V. Daly; Elwood Curtin Zimmerman; Karl N. Magnacca: ‘Insects of Hawaii; Volume 17; Hawaiian Hylaeus (Nesoprosopis) Bees (Hymenoptera, Apoidea). 2003
[2] K. N. Magnacca: Species Profile: Hylaeus simplex. In Shepherd, M. D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black (Eds.) Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, Oregon 2005