Ptilinopus goodwinii Holyoak

Lilac-crowned Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus goodwinii)

Distribution:

Cook Islands: ‘Atiu, Ma’uke

local names:

kukupa – ‘Atiu / Cook Islands

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This Lilac-crowned Fruit Dove is officially treated as a subspecies of the Rarotongan Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus rarotongensis Hartlaub & Finsch) from the island of Rarotonga, Cook Islands, yet differs quite much from that species and can be separated as a distinct species.

The species is now restricted to the island of ‘Atiu, Cook Islands, but another subspecies, not yet formally described, formerly inhabited the neighboring island of Ma’uke.

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Historical records of fruit doves from the islands of Aitutaki and Mangaia, Cook Islands, are most likely best regarded as distinct species as well.

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edited: 01.01.2019

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Awaous ocellaris Broussonet

Eyespot Goby (Awaous ocellaris)

The Eyespot Goby is an about 13 cm long freshwater goby that is indigenous to many mangrove areas, estuaries, and rivers from India to Polynesia.

The fish feed on green algae, small crabs, freshwater shrimps, and other invertebrates.

Like all Polynesian freshwater gobies, also the Eyspot Goby has an amphidromous life cycle, which means, that the spawning takes place in the freshwater, but the embryos are washed out into the ocean, where they remain for a planktonic phase before they return into freshwater to grow and to start the life cycle again.

The Samoan name of the species is mano’o ia pala.

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References:

[1] N. Mary; A. Dutartre; P. Keith; G. Marquet; P. Sasal: Biodiversité des Eaux Douces de Wallis et Futuna; Mission d’Octobre 2004. Rapport Final, Ministère de l’Outre-Mer 2006

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awaous-ocellaris-dsj-rer

Depiction from: ‘David Starr Jordan; Robert Earl Richardson: Check-list of species of fishes known from the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Printing 1910′

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org