Proterhinus adamsoni Perkins

Adamson’s Proterhinus (Proterhinus adamsoni)

This reddish colored species was described in the year 1932.

The species is known only from the island of Hatuta’a, where it lives among the stems of the Tomentose Waltheria (Waltheria tomentosa J. R. Forst. & G. Forst.)

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References:

[1] ‘R. C. L. Perkins: On two new species of Proterhinus from the Marquesas and the Inclusion of this genus in the family Aglycyderidae. Bishop Museum Bulletin 98. 17-21. 1932

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Depiction from: ‘R. C. L. Perkins: On two new species of Proterhinus from the Marquesas and the Inclusion of this genus in the family Aglycyderidae. Bishop Museum Bulletin 98. 17-21. 1932’

(This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.)

Trioza alipellucida Klyver

Marquesan Trioza Psyllid (Trioza alipellucida)

This species is endemic to the Marquesas, where it is known from at least five islands.

The Marquesan Trioza Psyllid reaches a length of about 0,3 cm, it is generally dark chocolate brown to jet black colored, usually with a yellow brown stripe one-third as wide as the thorax extending from the median posterior margin of the scutellum to the tips of the genae, with the stripe lacking or imperfectly developed in the darker specimens, with a patch of similar color on the thorax at the base of the wings.

The species appears not to be restricted to a single host, since it is known to feed on several native plant species, including Ilex anomala Hook. & Arn., Metrosideros collina (J. R. Forst. & G. Forst.) A. Gray and Weinmannia marquesana F. Br.. [1]

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References:

[1] F. D. Klyver: Anomoterga tahuata, new genus and new species, and other Chermidae from the Marquesas. Bishop Museum Bulletin 98: 93-101. 1932

Hypena longfieldae Collenette

Longfield’s Snout Moth (Hypena longfieldae)

Longfield’s Snout Moth was described in 1928.

The species is endemic to central Polynesia and can be found on the Austral Islands, the Marquesas and the Society Islands, where it is obviously restricted to higher elevations.

The moth reaches a wingspan of nearly 3 cm, it is extremely variable. [1]

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References:

[1] J. F. G. Clarke: The Lepidoptera of Rapa Island. Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology 56. 1971

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hypena-longfieldae-pto

Photo: Peter T. Oboyski; by courtesy of Peter T. Oboyski

http://nature.berkeley.edu/~poboyski/Lepidoptera/SocietyIslands.htm

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edited: 03.03.2017

Coleotichus adamsoni Van Duzee

Adamson’s Shield Bug (Coleotichus adamsoni)

Adamson’s Shield Bug is about 1,5 cm long, and was described in the year 1932 on the basis of several specimens that have been collected on some islands in the Marquesan archipelago.

The species, however, is also occurring on the Society Islands, at least on the islands of Mo’orea and Tahiti.

One of the known food plants of this species is the native tiatia (Dodonaea viscosa Jacq.). [1]

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References:

[1] E. P. Van Duzee: New Hemiptera-Heteroptera from the Marquesas. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 98: 177-192. 1932

Ocypode ceratophthalma (Pallas)

Horn-eyed Ghost-Crab (Ocypode ceratophthalma)

The Horn-eyed Ghost-Crab is indigenous to the Indo-Pacific, where it occurs from the coasts of East Africa far into Polynesia, where the animals run about the beaches in search for edible things, including washed up dead fish, or dead sea birds, but also newly hatched sea turtles.

It is a quite large species with a carapace size of up to 8 cm in diameter. It can be distinguished from other related crabs by the eyestalks extending beyond the eyes into long points, those stalks are longer in males, and shorter or almost absent in females.

In Samoa, the species is called avi’ivi’i resp. pa’a.

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ocypode-ceratophthalma-jp

Photo: J. Poupin; by courtesy of J. Poupin

http://decpoda.ecole-navale.fr/index.php
http://decapoda.free.fr

Caesalpinia bonduc (L.) Roxb.

Caesalpinia bonduc

Distribution:

Austral Islands: Rapa
Fiji: Leleuvia, Makaluva, Nasoata, Nayau, Nukuci, Nukulau, Nukulevu, Rotuma, Sawa-i-lau, Vanua Balavu, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu, Yasawa
Gambier Islands: Kamaka
Hawai’i Islands: Hawai’i, Kaua’i, Laysan, Maui, Moloka’i, Ni’ihau, O’ahu
Marquesas: Hatuta’a, Hiva Oa, Mohotani, Nuku Hiva, Tahuata, Ua Huka, Ua Pou
Niue
Norfolk Islands: Norfolk Island
Pitcairn Islands: Henderson Island
Samoa: Apolima, ‘Aunu’u, Manono, Namu’a, Nu’ulua, Nu’utele, Savai’i, ‘Upolu
Tonga: ‘Ata, Fafa, Foa, Niuatoputapu, Oneata, Onevai, Pangaimotu, Tongatapu

local names:

anaoso – Samoa
hihikolo – Hawai’i Islands
kakalaioa – Hawai’i Islands
soni – Vanua Levu / Fiji
tartar mann – Rotuma / Fiji

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References:

[1] Albert C. Smith: Flora Vitiensis Nova: A new flora of Fiji (Spermatophytes only). Vol. 3. Lawai, Kauai, Hawaii 1985

Cyclosorus subpectinatus (Copel.) Ching

Cyclosorus subpectinatus

Distribution:

Cook Islands: Rarotonga
Marquesas: Fatu Hiva, Tahuata, Ua Huka
Society Islands: Bora Bora, Huahine, Mo’orea, Ra’iatea, Tahiti

local names: –

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References:

[1] Li-Juan He; Xian-Chun Zhang: Exploring generic delimination within the fern family Thelypteridaceae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 757-764. 2012

Abrodictyum asae-grayi (Bosch) Ebihara & K. Iwats.

Abrodictyum asae-grayi

Distribution:

Fiji: Vanua Levu, Viti Levu
Marquesas: Hiva Oa, Nuku Hiva
Samoa: Savai’i, Ta’u, ‘Upolu
Society Islands: Ra’iatea, Tahiti

local names: –

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References:

[1] Atsushi Ebihara; Jean-Yves Dubuisson; Kunio Iwatsuki; Sabine Hennequin; Motomi Ito: A taxonomic revision of Hymenophyllaceae. Blumea 52(2): 1-60. 2006

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abrodictyum-asae-grayi-jn

Photo: Joel Nitta
http://www.mooreabiocode.org

(under creative commons license (3.0))
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Geniostoma rupestre J. R. Forst. & G. Forst.

Geniostoma rupestre

Distribution:

Austral Islands: Rapa, Rurutu (?)
Fiji: Fulaga, Gau, Kadavu, Koro, Lakeba, Nasoata, Nayau, Ovalau, Rotuma, Taveuni, Vanua Balavu, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu, Waya
Marquesas: Fatu Hiva, Hiva Oa, Nuku Hiva, Tahuata, Ua Pou
New Zealand: Great Barrier Island; Kapiti Island; North Island; Aorangi Island (Poor Knights Islands); Rangitoto Island; South Island; Manawa Tawhi Island, South West Island (Three Kings Islands); Tiritiri Matangi Island
Niue
Pitcairn Islands: Henderson Island
Samoa: Fanuatapu, Namu’a, Nu’ulua, Nu’utele, Savai’i, Ta’u, Tutuila, ‘Upolu
Society Islands: Mo’orea, Tahiti
Tonga: ‘Eua, Ha’apai, Kao, Motutapu, Onevai, Tafahi, Tofua, Tongatapu, ‘Uta Vava’u
Wallis & Futuna: Alofi, Futuna, ‘Uvea

local names:

age – Rurutu / Austral Islands
ange – Rapa / Austral Islands
faipuu – Society Islands
hangehange – New Zealand
taipoipoi – Samoa

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The species is split into several varieties, of which at least four occur within the Polynesian region, Geniostoma rupestre var. crassum (Cheeseman) Conn (endemic to New Zealand), Geniostoma rupestre var. glaberrimum (Benth.) Conn (most parts of Polynesia, especially French Polynesia), the nominate Geniostoma rupestre var. rupestre (western Polynesia), and Geniostoma rupestre var. tongense (A. C. Sm. & Stone) Conn (Fiji, Niue and Tonga).

Many of these varieties include synonyms that formerly were treated as distinct species. [1]

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References:

[1] Barry J. Conn: A taxonomic revision of Geniostoma Subg. Geniostoma (Loganiaceae). Blumea 26: 245-364. 1980

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geniostoma-r-v-rupestre-tt

nominate variety

Photo: Tavita Togia
http://www.inaturalist.org/people/tavita_togia2016

(under creative commons license (4.0))
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0